The origin of the humble splashback was as a protective surface in kitchens installed behind stoves, grills, hotplates, and sinks designed to protect walls from grease, splatters and water.

The splashback (or backsplash as it is sometimes called) was fairly basic and task-oriented. The material used was serviceable and ‘did the job’ but it was usually far from stylish and generally not integral to the kitchen design. Thankfully our design aesthetic has come a long way. Kitchens are now the hub of the home (It’s almost the only space where families and friends can commune without smartphones ruling) and a feature of many modern cafes and clubs.

splashback

Since people started knocking out walls and exposing kitchens to an open-plan layout, the look and feel of homes and cafes has changed dramatically. And so has the once humble splashback. Splashbacks are now an important feature of any kitchen and, as we know, kitchens and bathrooms sell houses and are a WOW factor in cafes and restaurants.

splashback

Kitchen design includes consideration of colour and textures in the walls, joinery, cabinetry, flooring, and splashbacks. In some instances, the counter top material can be continued up the wall and become the splashback. However, the most common option is to have a feature splashback that co-ordinates with the cupboards and counter tops.

splashbackOur 100% sheet metal in aged, antiqued and classic brass, bronze, patina, brushed and oxidised coppers and blackened aluminium’s are Class-A fire rated so can be installed behind stoves and hot plates, they do not require any special metal working tools and do not require grout. They are low maintenance and extremely price competitive against other high-quality options.

 

For other inspiring ways to use metal, you may like to read The Penny Drop with it’s Art Deco aesthetic, how the Hampton’s Bakery served up beautiful light brass, and the beauty of curves in counter fronts, servery’s, and reception desks.